Provinz Buenos Aires

147 posts in this topic

Posted

Kann es nur bestätigen: FlatEx hat abgerechnet auch die Käufe nach dem 15.10.2019!

Schaut richtig aus!

Keine Buchung bei comdirect bis jetzt (Käufe nach dem 15.10.2019)!

Share this post


Link to post

Posted

Comdirect wird den Stichtag für die Teiltilgung auf Ende Oktober korrigieren

Share this post


Link to post

Posted · Edited by Mojo-cutter

Wertpapierbezeichnung
Buenos Aires, Province of... EO-Bonds 2005(17-20) Reg.S
WKN A0GJKV
Poolfaktor 0,333333333
ISIN XS0234085461
Kupontag 01.11.2019

Fik. Qst. 15%


Zinsen gestern bei consors korrekt eingegangen.

 

Share this post


Link to post

Posted

Am 5.11.2019 um 19:07 von freesteiler:

Diba hat bei mir heute auch die Teiltilgung überwiesen, allerdings hat mich der Spaß wesentlich mehr Steuern gekostet als ich erwartet hatte. Nov18 musste ich auf die Teiltilgung noch 0 Steuern zahlen,  Mai19 lag der zu versteuernde "Veräußerungsgewinn" bei rund 2% der Teiltilgung und dieses Mal musste ich über 20% der Teiltilgung als Gewinn versteuern. Falls im Mai20 alles zurückgezahlt wird ist es ziemlich egal, aber wie die auf die Werte kommen ist mir noch ein Rätsel.

Komisch, bei mir hat die ING die Teiltilgung komplett ohne Steuern zurückgezahlt.

Nur die Zinsen wurden versteuert, inkl. 15% fiktiver Quellensteuer.

Share this post


Link to post

Posted

Am 5.11.2019 um 19:07 von freesteiler:

Diba hat bei mir heute auch die Teiltilgung überwiesen, allerdings hat mich der Spaß wesentlich mehr Steuern gekostet als ich erwartet hatte. Nov18 musste ich auf die Teiltilgung noch 0 Steuern zahlen,  Mai19 lag der zu versteuernde "Veräußerungsgewinn" bei rund 2% der Teiltilgung und dieses Mal musste ich über 20% der Teiltilgung als Gewinn versteuern. Falls im Mai20 alles zurückgezahlt wird ist es ziemlich egal, aber wie die auf die Werte kommen ist mir noch ein Rätsel.

Das passiert, wenn man die A0GJKV bereits vor langer Zeit zu sehr niedrigen Kursen gekauft hat und nun die Erlöse aus den Teiltilgungen den Einstandswert übersteigen. Ich gehe davon aus, daß bereits im Mai dies der Fall war und nun die aktuelle Rückzahlung als Gewinn voll besteuert wurde.

Die ING-(exDiBa) hat zwar einige Schwächen, aber Argentinien (fikt. QuSt sowie Teiltilgungen) beherrscht sie meiner Erfahrung nach. 

Share this post


Link to post

Posted

Verstehe, danke für die Info. Das wird es sein, die ersten Käufe dürften 2014 gewesen sein. Vermutlich wird jeder Kauf getrennt ausgewertet, da ich mit der Gesamtposition (Neuanlage der Teiltilgungen) sicher nicht soweit im Plus bin.

Share this post


Link to post

Posted

Citi Research

Argentina Credit Strategy Flash

Province of Buenos Aires default: Willingness vs. Ability

 Axel Kicillof is the new governor of the Province of Buenos Aires — Kicillof won a decisive victory in the Province of Buenos Aires last weekend. He served as the Economy Minister under CFK and is known to have a strong populist bent. The new administration takes office on December 10. In his meeting with Vidal last week, he suggested that the outgoing governor should roll back utilities tariffs. Kiciloff has already publicly stated that PBA will need to “re-profile” as well.

 PBA’s next coupon payment is in December – The next coupon payment for BUENOS 21s and 27s is December 9th and 15th respectively. While the payment for the 9th seems likely, the payment for the 15th has some uncertainties. PBA’s fiscal situation has improved in recent years but debt issuance has been significant. PBA’s global bonds interest bill is roughly $556mm annually (based on USD and EUR outstanding), representing about 5.5% of revenues.
 What could a potential “re-profiling” look like? – Based on previous restructurings, a ‘new’ coupon of around 4% will resonate well with investors.
However, the Province could try to force a 50% haircut in a very arbitrary manner but similar to the previous restructuring. However, assuming this new coupon and exit yield of 11%, the PBA bonds look attractive. While the bonds look cheap, they could get cheaper into the actual event of default.

 Collective action clauses (CACs) could allow Buenos Aires to avoid the holdout problem—Buenos Aires can force bondholders to accept the terms of a restructuring as long as a certain amount of holders above a threshold agree to the terms. Bonds issued after 2015 contain single-limb CACs, enabling PBA to restructure across multiple series' and more easily avoid the holdout problem.

PBA default: Willingness vs. Ability?
Axel Kicillof is the new governor of the Province of Buenos Aires — Kicillof won a decisive victory in the Province of Buenos Aires last weekend. As we have argued earlier, his win has more consequences than meets the eye. Kicillof was widely expected to beat Maria Eugenia Vidal in the provincial elections as previewed in the PASO. However, the important takeaway from the election is Kicillof’s contribution to Alberto Fernandez’s win. It is clear that Kicillof’s strong win aided Fernandez as Macri actually gained ground in provinces in the center of the country, implying Fernandez didn’t do all that well at the national level (excluding PBA).

Could the Province of Buenos Aires default in December? The new administration takes office on December 10. We highlighted in August that the Province of Buenos Aires is the most likely restructuring candidate along with the sovereign. PBA increased its debt burden significantly during the Macri administration - though we acknowledge Vidal inherited a large floating debt - a clear bone of contention for Kicillof. He has publicly highlighted this risk and has already indicated that PBA will be required to “re-profile” along with the sovereign. He recently said that outgoing governor Vidal should roll back utility tariffs, already signaling a populist stance. The question of PBA default is not of “if” but “when”.

The next coupon payments for BUENOS 21s and 27s are December 9th and 15th respectively. While the payment for the 9th seems likely, the payment for the 15th has some uncertainties.

PBA’s fiscal situation has improved in recent years, but debt issuance has been significant. PBA’s global bonds interest bill is roughly $556mm annually (based on USD and EUR outstanding), representing about 5.5% of revenues, (though they have different multilateral loans of about ARS10.5bn). In addition, the province has a primary surplus of around 5% total revenues. This implies that the debt service should be relatively manageable and hence, in our view, the question of “re-profiling” is often of political willingness rather than ability.


It is a matter of “willingness”. As we discussed above, while the Province of Buenos Aires’ debt burden has increased, the fiscal situation has improved as well over the last few years. Therefore, we think its ability to honor its obligation depends crucially on its willingness to do so. That willingness would have to entail implementing policies that are able to preserve/continue fiscal discipline. Within this context, the Province could have access to the market. One caveat, however: theirsituation – similar to other provinces – will depend on the development on the Sovereign . but just as in the previous default episode, they could differentiate themselves.
Timing of re-profiling does not have to be close to the default. We are concerned that PBA could skip the coupon payment as early as December 15 (see table above), yet the re-profiling proposal will come later. The Republic of Argentina could skip the coupon payment as early as the 28th of December on their global bonds, but we suspect that a PBA will try to coordinate the timing of the renegotiation with the Republic.

What could a potential “re-profiling” of PBA look like? We present an NPV analysis

Province of Buenos Aires bonds are already trading at distressed levels.Figure 4 shows that Province of Buenos Aires bonds are already trading at

“distressed” levels, with prices mostly in the mid-30s. A ‘hard’ restructuring is therefore already priced-in.
A ‘new’ coupon of around 4% will resonate well with investors, in our view.

The interest rate bill on external USD and EUR bonds is approximately USD556mn, which should be manageable. However, the Province of BA could propose to its bondholders to reduce this at least 50% (haircut depending on the bonds), in a totally arbitrary manner but similar to the previous restructuring, and higher than the potential haircut proposed by the Republic,To simplify things, we think they could propose a single bond with a 4% coupon. Incidentally, 4% is the coupon of the 2035 bonds issued in the previous restructuring (i.e. BUENOS 2035).

PBA bonds are cheap. Could they trade cheaper? As highlighted in the table above of current market prices, assuming the described bond structure proposed to bondholders and with an exit yield of 11%, the bonds look attractive. We highlight that the province of BA bonds trade on average 10pts below the Republic. Hence, from a risk-reward prospective they look more attractive. However, we think the bonds could trade lower into the actual event of default and therefore remain cautious.

Collective Action Clauses could allow Buenos Aires to avoid the holdout problem If the province defaults, it will have to convince bondholders to accept the terms of its restructuring (this will also be true for the Republic of Argentina, for that matter).

Some investors may decide to “holdout” and refuse to participate in the exchange if they expect they can get a better deal once the rest of the bonds are restructured.

Collective action clauses (CACs) allow the government to avoid this holdout problem by forcing all bondholders to accept its terms once a certain amount above a threshold accept the terms. There are three types of CACs: 1) Series-by-series, 2) Double limb, and 3) Single limb.

Buenos Aires bonds have different CACs. Buenos Aires bonds issued prior to 2015 contain “series-by-series” and “double-limb” collective action clauses, and bonds issued after 2015 add the “single limb” CAC For example, when restructuring BUENOS 2023, if 75% within the series agree to the terms, then all bondholders are subject to the terms (“seriesby-series”). Buenos Aires can potentially avoid the holdout problem even more easily if it groups multiple series’ of bonds and uses the “double-limb” CAC. In this case, it only needs 50% consent within the series and 66.67% across the entire principal amount of the multiple series’ (this makes it harder to block the measure:

the holdout investors would have to amass either 50% of the principal within a given series or 33.33% across all series’).

The single-limb CAC is even better for Buenos Aires; it only needs 75% participation across all series’, as long as all affected creditors are offered the same restructuring terms (“uniform consideration”). This makes holdout even more difficult, as investors would have to amass at least 25% across the entire grouping of series’. However, what is considered “uniform” is a bit of a gray area.(1)

1 Bonds issued prior to 2015 don’t have the “single-limb” CAC. However, the prospectuses of bonds issued after 2015 contain a specific paragraph referring to bonds issued in 2006, i.e. BUENOS 2035 (which was issued in the previous restructuring). This paragraph states that if Buenos Aires seeks a cross-series (i.e. “single-limb”) restructuring involving these 2006 bonds, then the 2006 bonds need to be included in the vote count of “securities affected by the proposed modification”; in other words, they must be treated uniformly with the other series’. We interpret this to mean that Buenos Aires can use single-limb CAC restructuring on these 2006 bonds, even though this CAC wasn’t included in their original prospectus, as long as the uniform consideration clause is met (i.e. they cannot be treated differently from post-2015 bonds in the cross-series restructuring). If Buenos Aires wants to treat these bonds differently, then it can’t group them into a cross-series CAC. However, as we are not lawyers,we caution against taking this interpretation for granted.

It remains to be seen which of these CACs Buenos Aires and Argentina will be able to invoke. CACs are widely present in sovereign and provincial bonds, but this wasn’t always the case. Before 2003, most sovereign bonds contained no CACs, and restructuring exchanges were done on a voluntary basis. In 2003, Mexico issued bonds with series-by-series CACs to prevent future holdout problems, and other EMs followed suit. Double-limb CACs were later created to improve the situation further, and in 2014, the ICMA and US Treasury created single limb CACs following holdout problems in Argentina and Greece. Indeed,Argentina’s long, drawn-out legal battles with holdouts over the past decade was one of the major incentives for the international community to adopt the more issuer-friendly (and non-holdout-friendly) single-limb CACs.

Share this post


Link to post

Posted

vor 15 Stunden von bonded:

... could allow Buenos Aires to avoid the holdout problem
... allow the government to avoid this holdout problem
... can potentially avoid the holdout problem

 

... die Anleihebesitzer sind aber nicht so blöd wie die Analysten glauben: je schlechter das Angebot desto niedriger die Zustimmung - auch nach 100 Jahren Moratorium.

Share this post


Link to post

Posted

@bonded

Super Research von der Citi - Dank!

Share this post


Link to post

Posted

vor 22 Stunden von bonded:

Citi Research
...

Bonds issued prior to 2015 don’t have the “single-limb” CAC. However, the prospectuses of bonds issued after 2015 contain a specific paragraph referring to bonds issued in 2006, i.e. BUENOS 2035 (which was issued in the previous restructuring). This paragraph states that if Buenos Aires seeks a cross-series (i.e. “single-limb”) restructuring involving these 2006 bonds, then the 2006 bonds need to be included in the vote count of “securities affected by the proposed modification”; in other words, they must be treated uniformly with the other series’.

Für den PBA35 gelten die vertraglich vereinbarten CACs, nicht retroaktiv irgendwelche CACs später aufgelegter Serien.

Diese Deutung halte ich daher für "gewagt".

Im übrigen sind Gläubiger nicht blöd - und im Falle Argentiniens mit reichem Erfahrungsschatz ausgestattet.

Share this post


Link to post

Posted

Consors storniert Einlösung PBA A0GJKV mit Schlusstag 17.10. und bucht mit Schlusstag 04.11. wieder ein. Valuta immer 04.11.

Share this post


Link to post

Posted

vor 17 Stunden von CorMaguire:

Consors storniert Einlösung PBA A0GJKV mit Schlusstag 17.10. und bucht mit Schlusstag 04.11. wieder ein. Valuta immer 04.11.

... Und das bedeutet, dass für die nach 17.10. mit Poolfaktor 33 erworbenen Stücke trotzdem keine Rückzahlung zu 1.11. gezahlt wurde, oder verstehe ich da was falsch.

Da werden sie noch etwas mehr korrigieren müssen.

Share this post


Link to post

Posted

Bei mir ist die Korrektur inzwischen erfolgt und alles in Ordnung. Umsätze nach dem 17.10. mit PF 1/3 abgerechnet und Bestandsstichtag Ende Oktober für die Teiltilgung (comdirect). Valuta ist für Zins, Tilgung und Korrekturbuchungen bei mir immer der 01.11.

Share this post


Link to post

Posted

Während die TT-Geburt A0GJKV noch in vollem Gange ist warten wir derweil auf den 15.11. - payday beim PBA35. :rolleyes:

Share this post


Link to post

Posted

vor 4 Stunden von charrua:

... Und das bedeutet, dass für die nach 17.10. mit Poolfaktor 33 erworbenen Stücke trotzdem keine Rückzahlung zu 1.11. gezahlt wurde, oder verstehe ich da was falsch.

Da werden sie noch etwas mehr korrigieren müssen.

Ich habe zwischen 17. und 31. nix gekauft, kann dazu also keine Info geben.

Share this post


Link to post

Posted

vor 7 Stunden von CorMaguire:

Ich habe zwischen 17. und 31. nix gekauft, kann dazu also keine Info geben.

Du hast das aber erwähnt. Vielleicht könntest Du dann auch erläutern, welche Konsequenzen das hat. Falls nicht macht der Post wenig Sinn.

Share this post


Link to post

Posted

vor 1 Minute von charrua:

Du hast das aber erwähnt. Vielleicht könntest Du dann auch erläutern, welche Konsequenzen das hat. Falls nicht macht der Post wenig Sinn.

Nö, nicht dass ich wüsste. Mit Einlösung war die Teiltilgung gemeint. Weil das Consors-Dokument halt so heißt.

 

Für mich hatte das, außer zusätzlichen Dokumenten im Postfach, gar keine Konsequenzen.

 

Für mich wäre es ein Hinweis darauf, dass es für die zwischen 17.10. und 31.10. mit Poolfaktor 0,33 erworbenen Stücke auch die Teiltilgung geben müsste, weil der Schlusstag jetzt der 04.11. ist.

 

Villeicht ist es aber Storno und Neuabrechnung falsch und es wird bald erneut storniert :)

Share this post


Link to post

Posted · Edited by charrua

Bei mir kam die von Dir erwähnte Neuberechnung noch nicht. Die alte war korrekt und nach einer "Neuberechnung" (ohne Dokument) fehlten mit über 5000 EUR.

Share this post


Link to post

Posted · Edited by CorMaguire

vor 10 Minuten von charrua:

Bei mir kam die von Dir erwähnte Neuberechnung noch nicht. Die alte war korrekt und nach einer "Neuberechnung" (ohne Dokument) fehlten mit über 5000 EUR.

Du weisst, dass Consors die Dokumente zeitlich etwas eigenwillig einsortiert?

 

Die Einlösung/Teiltilgung wurde zwar bei mir am 11.11. storniert und neu eingebucht, die Dokumente finden sich aber im Archiv unter dem Datum 04.11....

Share this post


Link to post

Posted · Edited by CorMaguire

Gerade bucht Consors das nächste Storno der Einlösung/Teiltilgung von A0GJKV. Grund ist wieder "Storno und Neuabrechnung wegen fehlerhaftem Schlusstag".

 

Bis jetzt habe ich also zweimal Einlösung und zweimal Storno.

 

Und jetzt die Einlösung/Teiltilgung wieder eingebucht, diesmal mit Schlusstag 01.11. Hoffe die haben's bald :w00t:

Share this post


Link to post

Posted

Überraschung :thumbsup:
Zinsen eingebuchtet bei comdirect, Valuta 15.11.

BUENOS AIR. 05/35 (WKN A0GJKR)

Share this post


Link to post

Posted

Am 16.11.2019 um 05:04 von Mojo-cutter:

Überraschung :thumbsup:
Zinsen eingebuchtet bei comdirect, Valuta 15.11.

BUENOS AIR. 05/35 (WKN A0GJKR)

flatex war nicht so schnell, aber heute auch gebucht, mit Valuta 15.11. (und sogar mit Anrechnung ausländischer Quellensteuer!)

(unter Vorbehalt des Eingangs, wie immer, hat hier aber wohl eine andere, relevantere Bedeutung ...)

kerdos

Share this post


Link to post

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!


Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.


Sign In Now